Bridges: Mathematics and Art I

Just registered for Bridges 2016 last week!

Simply put, Bridges is the best mathematics conference ever.  You meet people from all around the world who are interested in the interplay between mathematics and art.

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Sculpture at Bridges 2015 in Baltimore

Not just M. C. Escher, either (though many are interested in his work).  Some Bridges attendees (shall we call them Bridgers?) are artists by profession, but others are mathematicians, computer scientists, physicists — you name it.  All are artists by vocation.

Interests span not only art in a more usual sense — watercolor, acrylic, oil, pastel, drawing — but also digital art, sculpture in almost any medium you can think of, poetry, architecture, music, fiber arts, dance, digital animations and movies, fashion, origami, and likely there will be some new art form introduced this summer as well!

The art exhibition is amazing.  You can see a few examples above.  You see the wooden spiral?  Each inlaid rectangle is a different piece of wood!  The craftsmanship is really superb.

One neat aspect is that most of the artists also attend Bridges.  That means if you see something you really like, you can just look for the right name tag and start up a conversation.  As you would expect, all the artists are eager to discuss their work.

Be ready for some surprises, too.  I met my friend Phil Webster at the conference – we starting talking because I was from San Francisco, and he also lives in the Bay area.  So we’ve met up a few times since the conference to discuss mathematics, art, and programming.  He even gave a talk in our Mathematics Colloquium at the University of San Francisco.  Of course, his talk was great….

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Even if you don’t go to the conference, you can still appreciate all the art.  You can visit the Bridges 2015 online gallery and see all the art that was exhibited.  Not only are there descriptions of all the works by the artists themselves, but there’s also contact information so you can get in touch if you’d like.  Please do!

The Bridges 2016 gallery is not online yet, but I’ve got two pieces accepted for this year’s exhibition.  This is my favorite.

Spiral

Then there are the talks.  You learn so much just by going to them.  The range of topics is incredibly diverse — look back at the list above!  Last summer, I gave a talk about Random Walks on Vertices of Archimedean Tilings.  My favorite work discussed in the paper is Bear.  You can read the paper to learn how it was made, if you’re interested.  The first print of Bear is hanging in my friend Cory’s house in Florida.  Hi, Cory!

Bear4Web

As you’ll see if you click on the link to my paper, there is an archive of all papers — over 1000! — given at Bridges conferences since 1998.  What’s nice is that you can actually search for specific topics, so it’s easy to use.  No shortage of reading material on mathematics and art….

In addition to the exhibition and all the presentations, there are also dance performances, poetry readings, theatre performances, movie showings, a music night — any number of interesting activities relating mathematics and art.  If you want to learn more, just go to the Bridges 2016 website.  There’s complete information on the upcoming conference there.

This year, the conference is being held at the University of Jyväskylä in Jyväskylä, Finland.  I’ve never been to Finland before, so I’m looking forward to an exciting trip!  What’s also nice about the conference is that in the evenings, you can just take a stroll with other Bridgers, looking for some interesting place to have dinner.  I always love exploring new countries, and especially like trying new cuisines!

But even though Bridges 2016 is in July, I actually starting preparing last November.  Since there was a January deadline for submitting papers to the conference, and since I knew I’d be doing a lot of traveling over our Winter Break, I wanted to get an early start.  The papers are all reviewed by three referees, so your mathematics should be sound.  Usually they have comments to make, and so you often need to make some revisions a few months later before a final submission.

My paper is on fractals this year.  A lot of what I wrote in that paper you’ve already seen on my blog — but I’ll be sure to give a link when I write a follow-up post on Bridges 2016 later on in the summer.  Here’s one of my favorite images discussed in the paper.

koch090-150tweak

There are deadlines to submit artwork as well, so it’s important to be organized.  For both papers and artwork, the online submission system is actually really easy to use.  I just wanted to let you know something about the process so you can submit something to next year’s conference….

Last Fall, I received an email about a new addition to the Bridges menu — student scholarships.  And in my calculus class, I had a student Nick who is a double major in mathematics and art.

Turns out Nick was really interested in trying to submit to Bridges, so we worked out a one-credit directed study course just for that purpose.  As of this moment, I’m happy to say that two of Nick’s artworks were accepted!  And we just submitted the final revisions to his paper, and are waiting to hear back.  We should know about the scholarship soon — I’ll update this post when I have more information.  One of my favorite images from Nick’s paper is this one.

art4

You can read the paper to see how he creates it….link to follow.

So think about including Bridges in your future travel!  Many artists bring their families and make a summer vacation out of the conference.  It’s quite an experience.

And if you’re a student, consider submitting as well!  Maybe you’ll earn a scholarship to attend:  here’s more information on the Student Travel Scholarship.  Preference is given to those student who submit papers, artwork, or movies.

You will need a letter from one of your teachers or professors — so ask someone to be your mentor.  If you can’t find someone, well, just ask me.  I’ll be glad to help out (as long as I don’t get too many requests!).

Later on in the summer, I’ll tell you all about the experience.  Hope to see you at some Bridges conference soon!

P.S. (10 July 2106):  Nick did receive the travel scholarship.  Congratulations!

 

 

 

Published by

Vince Matsko

Mathematician, educator, consultant, artist, puzzle designer, programmer, blogger, etc., etc. @cre8math

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