Using Processing for the First Time

While I have discussed how to code in Processing in several previous posts, I realized I have not written about getting Processing working on your own computer.  Naturally I tell students how to do this in my Mathematics and Digital Art course.  But now that I have started a Digital Art Club at the University of San Francisco, it’s worth having the instructions readily accessible.

The file I will discuss may be used to create an image based on the work of Josef Albers, as shown below.

0001

See Day002 of my blog,  Josef Albers and Interaction of Color, for more about how color is used in creating this piece.

As you would expect, the first step is to download Processing.  You can do that here.  It may take a few moments, so be patient.

The default language used in Processing is Java.  I won’t go into details of why I’m not a fan of Java — so I use Python mode.  When you open Processing, you’ll see a blank document like this:

Day110Screen1

Note the “Java” in the upper right corner.  Click on that button, and you should see a menu with the option “Add Mode…”  Select this option, and then you should see a variety of choices — select the one for Python and click “Install.”  This will definitely take a few minutes to download, so again, be patient.

Now you’re ready to go!  Next, find some Processing code written in Python (from my website, or any other example you want to play around with).  For convenience, here is the one I’ll be talking about today:  Day03JosefAlbers.pyde.  Note that it is an Open Office document; WordPress doesn’t let you upload a .pyde file.  So just open this document, copy, and paste into the blank sketch.  Be aware that indentation is important in Python, since it separates blocks of code.  When I copied and pasted the code from the Open Office document, it worked just fine.  But in case something goes awry, I always use four spaces for successive indents.

Now run the sketch (the button with the triangle pointing to the right).  You will be asked to create a new folder; just say yes.  When Processing runs, it often creates additional files (as we’ll see in a moment), and so keeping them all in one folder is helpful.  You should also see the image I showed above; that is the default image created by this Processing program.

Incidentally, the button with the square in the middle stops running your sketch.  Sometimes Processing runs into a glitch or crashes, so stopping and restarting your sketch is sometimes necessary.  (I still haven’t figured out why it crashes at random times.)

Next, go to the folder that you just created.  You should see a directory called “frames.”  Inside, you should see some copies of the image.

Day110Screen2

Inside the “draw” function, there is a function call to “saveFrame,” which saves copies of the frames you make.  You can call the folder whatever you want; this is convenient, since you might want to make two different images with the same program.  Just change the folder name you save the images to.

A word about the syntax.  The “####” means the frames will be numbered with four digits, as in 0001.png, 0002.png, etc.  If you need more than 10,000 frames (likely you won’t when first starting), just add more hashtags.  The “.png” is the type of file.  You can use “.tif” as well.  I use “.tif” for making movies, and “.png” for making animated gifs.  There are other file types as well; see the documentation on saveFrame for more details.

Now let’s take a look at making your own image using this program.

Day110Screen3

If you notice, there are lines labelled “CHANGE 1” to “CHANGE 6” in the setup and draw functions.  These are the only lines you need to change in order to design you own piece. You may tweak the other code later if you like.  But especially for beginning programmers, I like to make the first examples very user-friendly.

So let me talk you through changing these lines.  I won’t bother talking about the other code right now — that would take some time!  But you don’t need to know what’s under the engine in order to create some interesting artwork….

CHANGE 1:  The hashtags here, by the way, indicate a comment in your code:  when your program runs, anything after a hashtag is ignored.  This makes it easy to give hints and provide instructions in a program (like telling you what lines to change).  I created a window 800 x 600 pixels; you can make it any size you want by changing those numbers. The “P2D” just means you’re working with a two-dimensional geometry.  You can work in 3D in Processing, but we won’t discuss that today.

CHANGE 2:  The “sqSide” variable indicates how big the square are, in units of pixels.  The default unit in Processing is always pixels, so if you want to use another geometry (like a Cartesian coordinate system), you have to convert from one coordinate system to another.  I do all this for you in the code; all you need to do is say how large each square is.  And if you didn’t go back and read the Josef Albers piece, by “square,” I mean a unit like this:

Day002Square

CHANGE 3, CHANGE 4:  The variables “sqRows” and “sqCols” indicate, as you would expect, how many rows and columns are in the final image.  Since I have 15 rows and the squares are 30 pixels on a side, the height of the image is 450 pixels.  Since my window is 600 pixels in height, this means there are margins of 75 pixels on the top and bottom.  If your image is too tall (or too wide) for the screen, it will be cropped to fit the screen.  Processing will not automatically resize — once you set the size of the screen, it’s fixed.

CHANGE 5:  The “background” function call sets the color of the background, using the usual RGB values from 0-255.

CHANGE 6:  The first three numbers are the RGB values of the central rectangles in a square unit.  The next three numbers indicate how the background colors of the surrounding rectangles change.  (I won’t go into that here, since I explain it in detail in the post on Josef Albers mentioned above.  The only difference is that in that post, I use RGB values from 0-1, but in the Processing code here, I use values from 0-255.  The underlying concept is the same.)

The last (and seventh) number is the random number seed.  Why is this important?  If you don’t say what the random number seed is (the code does involve choosing random numbers), every time you run the code you will get a different image — the computer just keeps generating more (and different) random numbers in a sequence.  So if you find an image you really like and don’t know what the seed is, you’ll likely never be able to reproduce it again!  And if you don’t quite like the texture created by using one random seed, you can try another.  It doesn’t matter so much if you have many rows and columns, but if you try a more minimalist approach with fewer and larger squares, the random number seed makes a big difference.

OK, now you’re on your own….  This should be enough to get you started, and will hopefully inspire you to learn a lot more about Python and Processing!

 

 

Published by

Vince Matsko

Mathematician, educator, consultant, artist, puzzle designer, programmer, blogger, etc., etc. @cre8math

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